Discipline and punish. The birth of the prison – Michel Foucault (versión en inglés)

Discipline & punish. The birth of the prison – Michel Foucault

Estado: usado (con subrayados de su antiguo dueño).

Editorial: Vintage.

Traducción: del francés al inglés de Alan Sheridan.

Precio: $150.

Society and Its Prisons
By DAVID J. ROTHMAN
The texts for Michel Foucault’s imaginative, illuminating yet troubling discourse are two penalties meted out in Paris less than 100 years apart. The first: the execution of the would-be regicide Damiens in a public square in 1757. The court sentenced him to be conveyed to the scaffold where “the flesh will be torn from his breasts, arms, thighs and calves with red hot pincers, his right hand… burnt with sulphur, and on those places where the flesh will be torn away, pour molten lead, boiling oil… and then his body drawn and quartered by four horses and his limbs and body consumed by fire, reduced to ashes.” (The penalty was carried out, but with such ineptitude as to increase the victim’s agony.) The second, some 80 years later: “The prisoners’ day will begin at six in the morning… At the first drum roll, the prisoners must rise and dress in silence, as the supervisor opens the cell doors.” After receiving a ration of bread, “they form into work-teams,” to spend the day in steady labor. In the evening, “the cell doors are closed and the supervisors go the rounds, in the corridors, to ensure order and silence.”
Foucault’s analysis of these two modes of punishment, public execution and torture as against the timetable of a prison, is of a very special sort that does not belong to one or another academic discipline. He has a fundamental concern for the principles of thought that underlie the creation and operation of social institutions, principles that he has traced out on the most abstract epistemological level (in such a difficult and not altogether rewarding book as “The Birth of the Clinic”), and with a penetrating sensitivity to broad cultural values (as in “Madness and Civilization”). He is often interested in origins, the first appearance of the mental hospital or the medical clinic, but he is not really a historian. There is more of the anthropologist about him, a greater attention to the fit of institutions in a society than to the dynamics of change. Further, a philosophical radicalism permeates his writings, an intense dissatisfaction with bourgeois culture and institutions, all of which means that “Discipline and Punish” is bound to be innovative and controversial.
This volume, let it quickly be noted, is the most accessible of all of Foucault’s writings, the most straightforward in prose and argument, the most cultural in orientation. Foucault, at points brilliantly and never falsely, “reads” the ceremonies of punishment in such a way as to anchor them firmly in their social setting.
Foucault opens with a stunning explication of the “theatre of terror” of a public execution. To the spectators, the occasion was a holiday (shops were closed, taverns were filled), and a fully satisfying one-in the most visible fashion, the spirit of retribution was appeased, right triumphed over wrong. But an execution was also a “scaffold service,” for the speed with which the tortured died was taken as a sign of God’s judgment. A quick death was His mercy. At the gallows, onlookers could decipher ultimate guilt and innocence, giving them a glimpse of justice as dispensed not merely on earth but in hell. Moreover, the ceremony had a carnival air about it, particularly in offering an opportunity to mock authority. Spectators could hear the victim curse judges, laws, government and religion, and then, by contagion, the spectators would often heap abuse not only on the offender, but on the soldiers and the executioner as well.
To the authorities, the ritual promised to deter crime. Indeed, at the scaffold some victims “confessed” to their errors, warning others not to follow in their footsteps, and these confessions were frequently published and distributed. But the authorities’ ultimate stake in the ceremony was in the very excess of the punishment over the crime. Since every violation of the law had an aura of treason to it, representing an attack on the body of the sovereign, the spectacle assumed something of the character of a coronation, reaffirming the supremacy of the crown. In all, public torture and execution was part Mardi Gras, part liturgy and part investiture.
Foucault moves next to “read” the prison, to locate each of its seemingly idiosyncratic features in the premises and practices of other institutions, particularly the school, the factory, the military and the hospital. Foucault seems unaware of the work of the American sociologist Erving Goffman and of the research among American historians linking these institutions; his findings are not altogether novel. An inmate in an American prison once exclaimed to a visitor that he would like to meet the dude who dreamed up the prison system, for he must have been born on Mars; Foucault makes it eminently clear that the inventors of the prison were very much the products of modern society. He constructs his arguments not by mapping precise lines of influence from one institution to another but by defining broad similarities of approach. It is not process but identity of style that interests him.
Schools, factories, hospitals and armies-as well as prisons-all divide space into distinct units (by wards, classrooms, by battlefield disposition); all connect time to stages of accomplishment (promotion in rank or grade); all classify (by skill or function or disease). At the most general level of similarity, all “normalize,” that is, allow for individual differences along a pre-established continuum. They acknowledge personal peculiarities and yet assign them to set categories. Each of these systems, in other words, recognizes distinctions precisely in order to homogenize them.
The creation of these systems, as Foucault persuasively demonstrates, expanded the scope of discipline and legitimized it. It turned the individual into a “case,” which simultaneously helped to explain his actions and to control them. The very concept of the individual as a case represented a “thaw” that liberated scientific knowledge (to think of the patient as a case was the beginning of medical innovation), and at the same time expanded institutional means of control (for example, the right of the hospital to confine the mentally ill). Thus, a case approach “at one and the same time constitutes an object for a branch of knowledge and a hold for a branch of power.”
In the instance of the prison, this case orientation encouraged the expansion of knowledge in such disciplines as criminology, psychology and eventually psychiatry. Concomitantly, it legitimized incarceration in the name of treatment. Since the institution could cure, it was proper to confine. Foucault is correct in noting that the birth of the prison is at one with the use of the rehabilitative ethic and the appearance of the dossier. Punishment moved from “the infinite segmentation of the body of the regicide” to “an investigation that would be extended without limit to a meticulous and ever more analytical observation… a file that was never closed.”
“Discipline and Punish” is clearly a tour de force that makes it impossible to think of prisons as distinct from the rest of society, as an aberration in form. But however significant this accomplishment, there remains problems of method and policy that are deeply disturbing. Foucault subtitles his book, “The Birth of the Prison.” Yet, aside from a few remarks that aggregations of populations and capital were the relevant historical forces, his analysis is entirely static. It is not simply that an elevated concern for the spirit of a culture prevents Foucault from descending to locate the actors who actually promoted the prison system. Rather, his approach compels him to overgeneralize to the point where the prison at all times and places becomes a constant and unvarying form of discipline-which is simply not true.
Prisons, like punishments, do have a history, although Foucault’s mode of discourse cannot illuminate it. The models upon which prisons organize themselves, for example, do change over time-in shorthand form, from museums of order and quasi-utopian communities in the 19th century (as at Auburn, N.Y.) to replications of normal communities in the 20th (as at Norfolk, Mass.). Moreover, Foucault does not allow us to enter prisons themselves to examine the translation of models into practice. He is more involved with the idea of steady labor than with the fact that prisons have never been able to enforce it. He is more devoted to the order in the concept than to the disorder in the reality.
Even more important, Foucault’s analysis overdetermines the place of the prison in modern society. The fit is too tight, too secure; there is no room for tension or disparity. Why is it that industrial societies, which are so very frugal with time, and measure it in seconds and minutes in the factory, abandon this is criminal justice and mete out sentences of five to ten years with remarkable casualness? Why is it that societies that are typically so impatient with failure tolerate the obvious inadequacies of prisons?
Foucault recognizes something of this problem in his closing pages. Having described the “structure” of the prison in modern society, he turns finally to the matter of its “function.” From the moment that the prison came into being, observers recognized that incarceration did not reduce crime or rehabilitate criminals. And yet, again and again, even the most enlightened critics (at least until the 1960’s, I would note) called for bigger and better prisons, more effective classification and treatment programs. How then reconcile failure with persistence? How understand the institution’s longevity, given so poor a record?
Foucault’s answer comes quickly: the prison endures because it performs a critical function in capitalist society. By turning criminals into “cases,” into abnormal types of one sort or another, it separates the criminal from the body of the working class. The ultimate purpose of the prison, Foucault declares, is to divide the outlaw from the proletariat, thereby reducing lower-class solidarity and protest. The illegalities of the dominant class survive through the confinement of the illegalities of the lower class.
I am not persuaded by Foucault’s assertion, nor by its corollary that crime is essentially a form of political action. To dispute the point would take us far beyond the substance of “Discipline and Punish.” Nor do I have any concise alternative formulation to offer here, except to say that a satisfactory explanation of the persistence of the prison system may well have to identify more actors than “society” and more elements than “capitalism.” Yet, to suspend judgment on this point does have one critical implication. I would not despair, as it appears that Foucault does, of the prospects for genuine amelioration in the prison system short of a reordering of society. Change can be significant without being total. And yet, to any reformer who thinks that it will be easily accomplished, that the adoption of determinate sentencing or the abolition of parole or the expansion of prisoners’ rights will transform the system in immediate and adequate fashion, I would be the first to cite Foucault. Whatever the disagreements, “Discipline and Punish” is that rare kind of book whose methods and conclusions must be reckoned with by humanists, social scientists and political activists.
Amor a primera vista
Elsa Kalish
(elinterpretador, sección Libros, martes 2 de octubre de 2007)
El nacimiento de la biopolítica, Curso en el Collège de France (1978-1979), de Michel Foucault, Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2007.
A veces sucede. Un día cualquiera, igual a todos, estas viajando en el tranvía, leyendo Radiolandia, sin esperar que suceda nada, cuando de repente, levantas la vista, distraída, y ahí, justo ahí, parado frente a vos, descubrís que esta Marlon Brando, agarrado al pasamanos y te sonríe.
A mi, dos veces, me sucedió, que me enamore a primera vista. Así, de repente, sin esperar ni buscar nada en ese momento, de repente, tan de repente, algo sucedió. Simplemente levante la vista y ahí estaba lo que siempre había esperado y buscado en la infinita proliferación de cosas que hay pululando en el universo. Y las dos veces sucedió igual, fue apenas visualizarlo en mi campo óptico, para saber que aunque no supiera nada de él, ya lo sabía todo, que siempre había sido parte de mi y que siempre lo seguiría siendo aunque jamás supiera siquiera su nombre. Y ambas veces, sentí, una mezcla de fascinación y espanto, un exceso de alegría y dolor, debatiéndose en mi corazón, al percibir la gracia de ese momento único en que por un instante se descorre el velo opaco y fugaz del tiempo, y quedas desnuda y sin aliento, frente a su sonrisa, que ahora y siempre, fue lo único, que anhelaste dentro tuyo, para que el cielo fuera celeste, el sol amarillo, los chocolates tuvieran sabor a chocolate y tu alma fuera algo más que una estúpida cosa.
A veces sucede. Y voy a escribir sobre uno de estos amores como una suerte de ofrenda hacia el otro.
Hace ya varios años, una tarde, estaba yo en un departamento del Once en la casa de la hermana de una amiga. La hermana de mi amiga era abogada y tenía una pequeña biblioteca. Como no podía ser de otro modo me acerqué a inventariar rigurosamente todos y cada uno de los ejemplares que poseía esta biblioteca. No habría más de cien libros. En su gran mayoría todos libros sobre leyes, códigos y algún que otro bet-seller intrascendente. Solo había un libro que no solo era una gran novela sino que tenía algo que ver con mi existencia, Cementerio de animales, de Stephen King, con traducción de Cesar Aira. Y sin embargo, en esa biblioteca carente de todo deseo para mi, encontre un libro que me llamo la atención. Era de tapas negras, estaba junto a otros libros sobre leyes y nada indicaba que pudiera significarme algo o que tuviera algo para decirme. Sin embargo, algo en él me llamo la atención y lo tomé. Leí el nombre de su autor, Michel Foucault. Jamás había escuchado hablar de él. Y el libro en cuestión, se titulaba, Vigilar y castigar. Qué fue lo que me impulsó a tomar ese libro y querer leerlo, en semejante contexto y sin saber nada del mismo ni de su autor. No lo sé. Pero fue verlo y desearlo. Quererlo. Querer leerlo. La cosa es que le consulte a mi amiga si podía llevarme el libro de su hermana para ojearlo en casa porque me interesaba y me dijo que sí. Cuando, por fin, comencé a leerlo, primero me causó fascinación y angustia la elegancia exquisita de su pluma, y luego, me partió la cabeza lo que en él se planteaba. Así se inicio, esta larga historia de amor, entre Michel y yo.
Y al cabo de un tiempo de conocerlo a Foucault, por estas cosas que tiene la vida, un buen día me encontré en las aulas de la UBA cursando materias, y supe entonces que este filósofo que tanto amaba era muy popular dentro de la papilla que se consume en la academia. Son dos, fundamentalmente, los hits foucaultianos que ya son clásico de clásicos dentro de la universidad argentina, en Sociales el rock duro y glamoroso del panóptico y en Letras la balada con la que todas las chicas alguna vez nos enamoramos, ¿Qué es un autor?
Cuando encuentro un autor que me fascina suelo leer todo lo que ha escrito y buscar paralelamente todo aquello que se ha escrito sobre él. Esto me a sucedido con muchos, pero solo unos pocos al cabo del tiempo siguen siendo una cantera inagotable a la cual siempre puedo volver para extraer algo nuevo que aun no leí, produciéndome asombro y alegría, que esas palabras, por las que ya pase, sigan imantadas del brillo que eclipsa mi deseo. Eso me pasa con Borges, con Fontanarrosa, con Arlt, con Martínez Estrada, con Pessoa, con Foucault y con algunos pocos más.
Lo cierto es que a mi no me da mucho la cabeza. No me da. En cuanto intento forzarla mas de la cuenta—demasiado habitualmente—empiezo a patinar. Sin embargo, con el tiempo, aprendí algo, que cuando acepto que soy bastante idiota para incorporar cosas que a otros con o sin esfuerzo les resulta relativamente posible asimilar al barulo, puedo adquirir cierta lucidez. Cuento esto porque leo ensayos y filosofía desde los 16 años, tengo 31 y nunca fui capaz de resumir de qué esta hablando Pirulo en el libro que este leyendo. Para mi la filosofía, el ensayo, la teoría son un misterio que no entiendo. Jamás entendí un puto libro de filosofía que haya leído. Sin embargo, la lectura de ensayos y filosofía es una parte inescindible de mi vida. No porque busque en ella entender nada—no tanto porque no haya nada que entender, ya que no puedo hacer semejante afirmación, porque como ya dije, no me da la cabeza para tanto—sino porque me hace pensar. Hace unos días atrás terminé de leer La arqueología del saber y no entendí nada, pero nada de nada. Si me preguntaran, ahora, de qué habla Foucault allí, solo podría afirmar que esta haciendo una teoría general sobre el método de investigación que lo llevo de la Historia de la locura en la época clásica a Las palabras y las cosas, y no mucho más, lo cual, por cierto, es lo mismo que no decir nada. Esto no se debe a que Foucault sea un escritor hermético y oscuro, todo lo contrario, es claro y didáctico, además de que esta lleno de ideas y las sabe expresar con gran belleza. Lo que sucede es que a mi la cabeza no me da—claro que cuando afirmo esto no me estoy haciendo la canchera, la linda, remarcando algo para afirmar lo contrario, no, es verdad, a mi la cabeza no me da como le da a otros, por caso: Foucault, y estaría buenísimo que fuera de otro modo, y que no lo sea, más de una vez, suele producirme angustia, pero bueno, asi se dieron las cosas. ¿Entonces por qué insistir con Foucault cuando no se lo entiende? Es sencillo, porque me hace pensar. He leido a incontables lectores de Michel Foucault, nacionales y extranjero—Gilles Deleuze, Maurice Blanchot, Alicia Páez, Gustavo Mallea, Didier Eribon, David Halperin, Marcelo Pompei, Felisa Santos, etcétera— y en su gran mayoría me he sorprendido descubriendo que lo que dicen yo ya lo sabía o estaba cerca de saberlo, salvo que no sabría como expresarlo, pero lo que me sucede con ellos, a diferencia de Michel Foucault, es que los puedo seguir bien que mal pero no me hacen pensar. Tomás Abraham, es quizá, la excepción cuando escribe sobre Foucault así como cuando se dedica a la tele o a la empresa de vivir, es decir, me hace pensar, y además, no pocas veces, reír, porque posee esa inusual característica dentro de su gremio—el gremio de los “inteligentudos”—, de poseer humor.
Ahora bien, ustedes a esta altura ya se deben estar preguntando, ¿cómo, esta no era una reseña sobre El nacimiento de la biopolítica, y entonces, por qué, no dice una puta palabra, esta mina, acerca del libro en cuestión que se supone que tendría que estar reseñando, eh? Bien, ahora diré algo sobre el libro en cuestión que estoy reseñando para tranquilidad del lector.
Desde que Fondo de Cultura Económica distribuyó hará cosa de dos meses atrás, en las librerías de Buenos Aires, El nacimiento de la biopolítica, que cada vez que paso por una librería, él y yo, nos miramos, nos intuimos, nos deseamos, nos presentimos, nos histeriqueamos, nos hacemos promesas mudas y luego, el mismo azar caprichoso de la ciudad que nos reunió nos vuelve a perder cada cual por su lado, solos, infinitamente solos. Lo que quiero decir, es que no tener plata en un país del tercer mundo no es nada fácil, si es que en alguno lo es, claro. Lo cierto es que desde que salió el libro no lo he podido leer porque no tengo el dinero necesario para comprarlo. Así es este mundo, te mete en la cabeza que consumir es algo genial, que le da consistencia a tu identidad, pero no te aclara que para llegar a ser ese consumidor ideal pleno de derechos y deberes, feliz de la vida, como son felices las personas que aparecen en las propagandas de celulares, lácteos o gaseosas, hay cupo limitado. No es tan grave después de todo—mucho más grave es que el kilo de bananas cueste más de 4 pesos, eso sí es realmente grave, porque consumir bananas diariamente aporta el potasio que necesitan los músculos del cuerpo para que éste no se desplome, y el corazón, les recuerdo, es un músculo, que necesita tanto amor como potasio para poder hacer toc-toc toc-toc toc-toc y seguir el tempo de la melodía de los días y las noches, armoniosamente, sin desafinar (1)—, ya en algún momento conseguiré el dinero necesario para comprarlo y lo leeré. Por suerte el libro lo publicó Fondo de Cultura Económica que es una editorial que para mi presupuesto es carísima, pero no imposible como si lo hubieran publicado Amorrortu, Paidos, Ciruela o Taurus. Por otra parte, si lo tuviera el libro y lo hubiera leido, seguramente no podría haber dicho algo muy distinto a esto que cuento aquí, que leo a Foucault, no porque lo entienda sino porque me hace pensar.
(1)
¿Acaso no es éste uno de los temas fundamentales que intenta pensar Foucault en La hermenéutica del sujeto: del consumo correcto y equilibrado de amor y potasio que necesita el corazón? ¿Acaso todas las tecnologías del yo y del cuidado de sí no están pensadas y dirigidas solo para que el corazón consiga articular armoniosamente su propio toc-toc toc-toc toc-toc y así lograr hacer presente en el discurso una verdad que ponga en tensión al propio sujeto?

 

ENTREGA A DOMICILIO (OPCIONAL – CAP. FED.) $50.

Contacto: juanpablolief@hotmail.com

Anuncios

Acerca de libroskalish

Libros difíciles de encontrar a buen precio.
Esta entrada fue publicada en Michel Foucault, zzz---EN INGLÉS---zzz. Guarda el enlace permanente.

Una respuesta a Discipline and punish. The birth of the prison – Michel Foucault (versión en inglés)

  1. Elsa Kalish dijo:

    Amor a primera vista
    (elinterpretador, sección Libros, martes 2 de octubre de 2007)

    El nacimiento de la biopolítica, Curso en el Collège de France (1978-1979), de Michel Foucault, Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2007.

    A veces sucede. Un día cualquiera, igual a todos, estas viajando en el tranvía, leyendo Radiolandia, sin esperar que suceda nada, cuando de repente, levantas la vista, distraída, y ahí, justo ahí, parado frente a vos, descubrís que esta Marlon Brando, agarrado al pasamanos y te sonríe.

    A mi, dos veces, me sucedió, que me enamore a primera vista. Así, de repente, sin esperar ni buscar nada en ese momento, de repente, tan de repente, algo sucedió. Simplemente levante la vista y ahí estaba lo que siempre había esperado y buscado en la infinita proliferación de cosas que hay pululando en el universo. Y las dos veces sucedió igual, fue apenas visualizarlo en mi campo óptico, para saber que aunque no supiera nada de él, ya lo sabía todo, que siempre había sido parte de mi y que siempre lo seguiría siendo aunque jamás supiera siquiera su nombre. Y ambas veces, sentí, una mezcla de fascinación y espanto, un exceso de alegría y dolor, debatiéndose en mi corazón, al percibir la gracia de ese momento único en que por un instante se descorre el velo opaco y fugaz del tiempo, y quedas desnuda y sin aliento, frente a su sonrisa, que ahora y siempre, fue lo único, que anhelaste dentro tuyo, para que el cielo fuera celeste, el sol amarillo, los chocolates tuvieran sabor a chocolate y tu alma fuera algo más que una estúpida cosa.

    A veces sucede. Y voy a escribir sobre uno de estos amores como una suerte de ofrenda hacia el otro.

    Hace ya varios años, una tarde, estaba yo en un departamento del Once en la casa de la hermana de una amiga. La hermana de mi amiga era abogada y tenía una pequeña biblioteca. Como no podía ser de otro modo me acerqué a inventariar rigurosamente todos y cada uno de los ejemplares que poseía esta biblioteca. No habría más de cien libros. En su gran mayoría todos libros sobre leyes, códigos y algún que otro bet-seller intrascendente. Solo había un libro que no solo era una gran novela sino que tenía algo que ver con mi existencia, Cementerio de animales, de Stephen King, con traducción de Cesar Aira. Y sin embargo, en esa biblioteca carente de todo deseo para mi, encontre un libro que me llamo la atención. Era de tapas negras, estaba junto a otros libros sobre leyes y nada indicaba que pudiera significarme algo o que tuviera algo para decirme. Sin embargo, algo en él me llamo la atención y lo tomé. Leí el nombre de su autor, Michel Foucault. Jamás había escuchado hablar de él. Y el libro en cuestión, se titulaba, Vigilar y castigar. Qué fue lo que me impulsó a tomar ese libro y querer leerlo, en semejante contexto y sin saber nada del mismo ni de su autor. No lo sé. Pero fue verlo y desearlo. Quererlo. Querer leerlo. La cosa es que le consulte a mi amiga si podía llevarme el libro de su hermana para ojearlo en casa porque me interesaba y me dijo que sí. Cuando, por fin, comencé a leerlo, primero me causó fascinación y angustia la elegancia exquisita de su pluma, y luego, me partió la cabeza lo que en él se planteaba. Así se inicio, esta larga historia de amor, entre Michel y yo.

    Y al cabo de un tiempo de conocerlo a Foucault, por estas cosas que tiene la vida, un buen día me encontré en las aulas de la UBA cursando materias, y supe entonces que este filósofo que tanto amaba era muy popular dentro de la papilla que se consume en la academia. Son dos, fundamentalmente, los hits foucaultianos que ya son clásico de clásicos dentro de la universidad argentina, en Sociales el rock duro y glamoroso del panóptico y en Letras la balada con la que todas las chicas alguna vez nos enamoramos, ¿Qué es un autor?

    Cuando encuentro un autor que me fascina suelo leer todo lo que ha escrito y buscar paralelamente todo aquello que se ha escrito sobre él. Esto me a sucedido con muchos, pero solo unos pocos al cabo del tiempo siguen siendo una cantera inagotable a la cual siempre puedo volver para extraer algo nuevo que aun no leí, produciéndome asombro y alegría, que esas palabras, por las que ya pase, sigan imantadas del brillo que eclipsa mi deseo. Eso me pasa con Borges, con Fontanarrosa, con Arlt, con Martínez Estrada, con Pessoa, con Foucault y con algunos pocos más.

    Lo cierto es que a mi no me da mucho la cabeza. No me da. En cuanto intento forzarla mas de la cuenta—demasiado habitualmente—empiezo a patinar. Sin embargo, con el tiempo, aprendí algo, que cuando acepto que soy bastante idiota para incorporar cosas que a otros con o sin esfuerzo les resulta relativamente posible asimilar al barulo, puedo adquirir cierta lucidez. Cuento esto porque leo ensayos y filosofía desde los 16 años, tengo 31 y nunca fui capaz de resumir de qué esta hablando Pirulo en el libro que este leyendo. Para mi la filosofía, el ensayo, la teoría son un misterio que no entiendo. Jamás entendí un puto libro de filosofía que haya leído. Sin embargo, la lectura de ensayos y filosofía es una parte inescindible de mi vida. No porque busque en ella entender nada—no tanto porque no haya nada que entender, ya que no puedo hacer semejante afirmación, porque como ya dije, no me da la cabeza para tanto—sino porque me hace pensar. Hace unos días atrás terminé de leer La arqueología del saber y no entendí nada, pero nada de nada. Si me preguntaran, ahora, de qué habla Foucault allí, solo podría afirmar que esta haciendo una teoría general sobre el método de investigación que lo llevo de la Historia de la locura en la época clásica a Las palabras y las cosas, y no mucho más, lo cual, por cierto, es lo mismo que no decir nada. Esto no se debe a que Foucault sea un escritor hermético y oscuro, todo lo contrario, es claro y didáctico, además de que esta lleno de ideas y las sabe expresar con gran belleza. Lo que sucede es que a mi la cabeza no me da—claro que cuando afirmo esto no me estoy haciendo la canchera, la linda, remarcando algo para afirmar lo contrario, no, es verdad, a mi la cabeza no me da como le da a otros, por caso: Foucault, y estaría buenísimo que fuera de otro modo, y que no lo sea, más de una vez, suele producirme angustia, pero bueno, asi se dieron las cosas. ¿Entonces por qué insistir con Foucault cuando no se lo entiende? Es sencillo, porque me hace pensar. He leido a incontables lectores de Michel Foucault, nacionales y extranjero—Gilles Deleuze, Maurice Blanchot, Alicia Páez, Gustavo Mallea, Didier Eribon, David Halperin, Marcelo Pompei, Felisa Santos, etcétera— y en su gran mayoría me he sorprendido descubriendo que lo que dicen yo ya lo sabía o estaba cerca de saberlo, salvo que no sabría como expresarlo, pero lo que me sucede con ellos, a diferencia de Michel Foucault, es que los puedo seguir bien que mal pero no me hacen pensar. Tomás Abraham, es quizá, la excepción cuando escribe sobre Foucault así como cuando se dedica a la tele o a la empresa de vivir, es decir, me hace pensar, y además, no pocas veces, reír, porque posee esa inusual característica dentro de su gremio—el gremio de los “inteligentudos”—, de poseer humor.

    Ahora bien, ustedes a esta altura ya se deben estar preguntando, ¿cómo, esta no era una reseña sobre El nacimiento de la biopolítica, y entonces, por qué, no dice una puta palabra, esta mina, acerca del libro en cuestión que se supone que tendría que estar reseñando, eh? Bien, ahora diré algo sobre el libro en cuestión que estoy reseñando para tranquilidad del lector.

    Desde que Fondo de Cultura Económica distribuyó hará cosa de dos meses atrás, en las librerías de Buenos Aires, El nacimiento de la biopolítica, que cada vez que paso por una librería, él y yo, nos miramos, nos intuimos, nos deseamos, nos presentimos, nos histeriqueamos, nos hacemos promesas mudas y luego, el mismo azar caprichoso de la ciudad que nos reunió nos vuelve a perder cada cual por su lado, solos, infinitamente solos. Lo que quiero decir, es que no tener plata en un país del tercer mundo no es nada fácil, si es que en alguno lo es, claro. Lo cierto es que desde que salió el libro no lo he podido leer porque no tengo el dinero necesario para comprarlo. Así es este mundo, te mete en la cabeza que consumir es algo genial, que le da consistencia a tu identidad, pero no te aclara que para llegar a ser ese consumidor ideal pleno de derechos y deberes, feliz de la vida, como son felices las personas que aparecen en las propagandas de celulares, lácteos o gaseosas, hay cupo limitado. No es tan grave después de todo—mucho más grave es que el kilo de bananas cueste más de 4 pesos, eso sí es realmente grave, porque consumir bananas diariamente aporta el potasio que necesitan los músculos del cuerpo para que éste no se desplome, y el corazón, les recuerdo, es un músculo, que necesita tanto amor como potasio para poder hacer toc-toc toc-toc toc-toc y seguir el tempo de la melodía de los días y las noches, armoniosamente, sin desafinar (1)—, ya en algún momento conseguiré el dinero necesario para comprarlo y lo leeré. Por suerte el libro lo publicó Fondo de Cultura Económica que es una editorial que para mi presupuesto es carísima, pero no imposible como si lo hubieran publicado Amorrortu, Paidos, Ciruela o Taurus. Por otra parte, si lo tuviera el libro y lo hubiera leido, seguramente no podría haber dicho algo muy distinto a esto que cuento aquí, que leo a Foucault, no porque lo entienda sino porque me hace pensar.

    (1)
    ¿Acaso no es éste uno de los temas fundamentales que intenta pensar Foucault en La hermenéutica del sujeto: del consumo correcto y equilibrado de amor y potasio que necesita el corazón? ¿Acaso todas las tecnologías del yo y del cuidado de sí no están pensadas y dirigidas solo para que el corazón consiga articular armoniosamente su propio toc-toc toc-toc toc-toc y así lograr hacer presente en el discurso una verdad que ponga en tensión al propio sujeto?

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s